Simple, smart online Wills in Nova Scotia

Create a legally-binding Will to protect the people who matter most to you.

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AS FEATURED IN
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How It WorksWe guide you from start to finish

Estate planning doesn't have to be complicated. In fact, you can get yours done in 3 easy steps.

1

Answer questions about you and your wishes.

2

In just a few seconds, Epilogue will auto-generate your custom Will.

3

Follow the signing instructions to make it legally binding.

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In collaboration with RBC

Together with RBC, we are helping Canadians plan for their future and create the legacy they want.

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Our MissionDemocratizing estate planning for the people of Nova Scotia

Epilogue is different. It was founded by two former estate lawyers who believe that planning for the future and protecting your family shouldn't cost a fortune. So they built a company to bring their vision to life. With Epilogue, anyone in Nova Scotia can make a legally binding, lawyer-quality Will in 20 minutes.

TestimonialsWhat our customers are saying

I was very impressed with the Epilogue service. I worked through the questions in 10 minutes & finished my estate planning. As a frontline worker, I see the need for this service...

Martina Campbell-Segree

I held it off for a while because I thought it would take a lot of time and be really intense - something I regret doing. The process was so simple. It took me 5-10 minutes...

Jesse Abrams

I have been procrastinating drawing up a Will for far too long. A friend recommended EpilogueWills.com to me. It was incredibly straightforward, simple, easy and fast...

Michele Rosen
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PricingOur simple pricing plan
IndividualCouple
Will OnlyEverything you need to set up a legally binding Will$139
  • Make your own custom Will

  • Express your funeral and burial wishes

  • Includes detailed signing instructions

  • Receive a code to register your Will with the Canada Will Registry ($40 value)

  • Update for free, anytime

Will + Incapacity DocumentsComplete protection that covers both death and incapacity$179
  • Make your own custom Will

  • Express your funeral and burial wishes

  • Includes detailed signing instructions

  • Receive a code to register your Will with the Canada Will Registry ($40 value)

  • Update for free, anytime

  • Appoint someone to handle your finances if you become incapable

  • Name someone to make health care decisions for you if you cannot

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Your Will sent right to your door

Once you finish your Will, you'll have the option to have it printed and mailed straight to you.

FAQs

When someone dies without a Will, it's called dying "intestate". When someone dies intestate, they don't get a say in important decisions like how their assets will be distributed, who gets to be in charge of the process, and who will take care of any minor children. The rules about how assets are distributed differ depending on the situation. Here are some of the rules that apply to someone who dies without a Will in Nova Scotia:

When someone dies without a Will, it's called dying "intestate". When someone dies intestate, they don't get a say in important decisions like how their assets will be distributed, who gets to be in charge of the process, and who will take care of any minor children. The rules about how assets are distributed differ depending on the situation. Here are some of the rules that apply to someone who dies without a Will in Nova Scotia:

• A spouse and no children: The spouse gets everything.

• A spouse and no children: The spouse gets everything.

• A spouse and one child (with the same spouse): The spouse gets the first $50,000 or the family home (whichever is worth more). The remainder is divided equally between the spouse and child.

• A spouse and one child (with the same spouse): The spouse gets the first $50,000 or the family home (whichever is worth more). The remainder is divided equally between the spouse and child.

• A spouse and multiple children (with the same spouse): The spouse gets the first $50,000 or the family home (whichever is worth more). One-third of the remainder also goes to the spouse, and the remaining two-thirds is split between the children.

• A spouse and multiple children (with the same spouse): The spouse gets the first $50,000 or the family home (whichever is worth more). One-third of the remainder also goes to the spouse, and the remaining two-thirds is split between the children.

• Children but no surviving spouse: Everything is split equally between children. If a child is not alive, but they have kids of their own who are alive (grandchildren of the person who died intestate), the deceased child's portion is shared equally among those kids.

• Children but no surviving spouse: Everything is split equally between children. If a child is not alive, but they have kids of their own who are alive (grandchildren of the person who died intestate), the deceased child's portion is shared equally among those kids.

• No living spouse or children: Everything goes to the deceased's parents (or surviving parent, if there is only one). If the parents aren't alive, then everything is split between the deceased's siblings (or the descendants of a sibling who is not alive.)

• No living spouse or children: Everything goes to the deceased's parents (or surviving parent, if there is only one). If the parents aren't alive, then everything is split between the deceased's siblings (or the descendants of a sibling who is not alive.)

A lawyer is not necessary to make a legally-binding Last Will and Testament in Nova Scotia. In most cases, as long as the testator (person making the Will) is at least 19 and is "of sound mind", they can make a legal Will.

A lawyer is not necessary to make a legally-binding Last Will and Testament in Nova Scotia. In most cases, as long as the testator (person making the Will) is at least 19 and is "of sound mind", they can make a legal Will.

Having said that, there are a few situations where someone may want to get in touch with a lawyer to make a Will, such as:

Having said that, there are a few situations where someone may want to get in touch with a lawyer to make a Will, such as:

• If they want to exclude a spouse, child, or another dependant from their Will;

• If they want to exclude a spouse, child, or another dependant from their Will;

• If they want to distribute their assets unequally among their children;

• If they want to distribute their assets unequally among their children;

• If they are in a second marriage/common-law relationship but have children from a prior relationship;

• If they are in a second marriage/common-law relationship but have children from a prior relationship;

• If there is a family member with a disability who is receiving government benefits;

• If there is a family member with a disability who is receiving government benefits;

• If they own assets, like real estate, outside of Canada; or

• If they own assets, like real estate, outside of Canada; or

• If they want to engage in sophisticated tax planning.

• If they want to engage in sophisticated tax planning.

Parents are usually the legal guardians of their own children. In most cases, if one of them passes away before the other, the surviving parent would usually continue to be the legal guardian of any minor children.

Parents are usually the legal guardians of their own children. In most cases, if one of them passes away before the other, the surviving parent would usually continue to be the legal guardian of any minor children.

A parent (or other legal guardian of minor children) can name someone in their Will to take over that role if they are the last surviving guardian of the children. If the last surviving guardian passes away (or if both guardians die simultaneously), the person named in their Will would assume the responsibilities of legal guardianship.

A parent (or other legal guardian of minor children) can name someone in their Will to take over that role if they are the last surviving guardian of the children. If the last surviving guardian passes away (or if both guardians die simultaneously), the person named in their Will would assume the responsibilities of legal guardianship.

Someone's Will only takes effect once they are no longer alive. However, there are many cases where someone is alive but is no longer capable of making decisions for themselves. This can happen as a result of an accident or due to general cognitive decline that can occur with ageing. This is where a Power of Attorney (POA) becomes important.

Someone's Will only takes effect once they are no longer alive. However, there are many cases where someone is alive but is no longer capable of making decisions for themselves. This can happen as a result of an accident or due to general cognitive decline that can occur with ageing. This is where a Power of Attorney (POA) becomes important.

A POA is made by someone while they are still mentally capable. It allows them to name the person who would be authorized to manage their financial affairs (e.g. paying bills, managing investments, selling property) in the event that they are alive but have lost the capacity to manage these things for themselves.

A POA is made by someone while they are still mentally capable. It allows them to name the person who would be authorized to manage their financial affairs (e.g. paying bills, managing investments, selling property) in the event that they are alive but have lost the capacity to manage these things for themselves.

In Nova Scotia, this document is sometimes referred to as an Enduring Power of Attorney, and the person appointed to make decisions is called the “attorney” (even though they don't actually have to be a lawyer).

In Nova Scotia, this document is sometimes referred to as an Enduring Power of Attorney, and the person appointed to make decisions is called the “attorney” (even though they don't actually have to be a lawyer).

Before an attorney deals with real estate on behalf of an incapable person, their POA needs to be registered with the Nova Scotia Land Registry. To do this, the POA must have an accompanying document called an Affidavit of Execution.

Before an attorney deals with real estate on behalf of an incapable person, their POA needs to be registered with the Nova Scotia Land Registry. To do this, the POA must have an accompanying document called an Affidavit of Execution.

A Personal Directive is a legal document that lets someone appoint an individual to make decisions about their personal and health care needs if they are not capable of making those decisions for themself. In some provinces, this type of document is referred to as a Power of Attorney for Personal Care or a Health Care Directive and is sometimes referred to as a Living Will.

A Personal Directive is a legal document that lets someone appoint an individual to make decisions about their personal and health care needs if they are not capable of making those decisions for themself. In some provinces, this type of document is referred to as a Power of Attorney for Personal Care or a Health Care Directive and is sometimes referred to as a Living Will.

In Nova Scotia, the person appointed to make these decisions is called a 'delegate'. Someone cannot appoint more than one delegate unless the delegates are given different decision-making responsibilities.

In Nova Scotia, the person appointed to make these decisions is called a 'delegate'. Someone cannot appoint more than one delegate unless the delegates are given different decision-making responsibilities.

Make your Will today

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