Simple, smart online Wills in Saskatchewan

Create a legally-binding Will to protect the people who matter most to you.

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How It Works

We guide you from start to finish

Estate planning doesn’t have to be complicated. In fact, you can get yours done in 3 easy steps.

  1. Answer questions about you and your wishes.
  2. In just a few seconds, Epilogue will auto-generate your custom Will.
  3. Follow the signing instructions to make it legally binding.
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Our Mission

Democratizing estate planning for the people of Saskatchewan

Epilogue was founded by two estate lawyers who believe that planning for the future and protecting your family shouldn’t cost a fortune. So, they built a company to bring their vision to life. With Epilogue, anyone in Saskatchewan can make a legally binding, lawyer-quality Will in 20 minutes.

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What our customers are saying

Pricing

Our simple pricing plan

Individual
Couple
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Will Only
Everything you need to set up a legally binding Will
$139
Wills Only
Give each other peace of mind for when you’re no longer here
$229
  • Make your own custom Will
  • Express your funeral and burial wishes
  • Includes detailed signing instructions
  • Receive a code to register your Will with the Canada Will Registry ($40 value)
  • Update for free, anytime
  • Make your own custom Wills
  • Express your funeral and burial wishes
  • Includes detailed signing instructions
  • Receive codes to register your Wills with the Canada Will Registry ($80 value)
  • Update for free, anytime
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Will + Incapacity Documents
Complete protection that covers both death and incapacity
$179
Wills + Incapacity Documents
Complete protection for both partners, covering death and incapacity
$289
  • Make your own custom Will
  • Express your funeral and burial wishes
  • Includes detailed signing instructions
  • Receive a code to register your Will with the Canada Will Registry ($40 value)
  • Update for free, anytime
  • Appoint someone to handle your finances if you become incapable with an Enduring Power of Attorney
  • Name someone to make health care decisions for you if you cannot with a Healthcare Directive
  • Make your own custom Wills
  • Express your funeral and burial wishes
  • Includes detailed signing instructions
  • Receive codes to register your Wills with the Canada Will Registry ($80 value)
  • Update for free, anytime
  • You’ll each appoint someone to handle your finances if you become incapable with an Enduring Power of Attorney
  • You’ll each name someone to make health care decisions for you if you cannot with a Healthcare Directive
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Your Will sent right to your door

Once you finish your Will, you’ll have the option to have it printed and mailed straight to you.

FAQs

What happens if I die without a Will in Saskatchewan?

When someone dies without a Will, it’s called dying “intestate”. When someone dies intestate, they don’t get a say in important decisions like how their assets will be distributed, who gets to be in charge of the process, and who will take care of any minor children. The rules about how assets are distributed differ depending on the situation.

Here are some of the rules that apply to someone who dies without a Will in Saskatchewan:

  • A spouse and no children: The spouse gets everything.
  • A spouse and children (all with the same spouse): The spouse gets everything.
  • A spouse and children (not all with the same spouse): The surviving spouse gets $200,000 “off the top,” and the rest is divided among the spouse and children. If there is only one child, one-half goes to the spouse, and one-half to the children. If there is more than one child, the spouse gets 1/3, and the rest is split among the children.
  • Children but no surviving spouse: Everything is split equally between children. If a child is not alive, but they have kids of their own who are alive (grandchildren of the person who died intestate), the deceased child’s portion is divided equally among those kids.
  • No living spouse or children: Everything goes to the deceased’s parents (or surviving parent, if there is only one). If the parents aren’t alive, then everything is split between the deceased’s siblings (or the descendants of a sibling who is not alive).

Learn more here

Do I need a lawyer to make my Will in Saskatchewan?

A lawyer is not necessary to make a legally-binding Last Will and Testament in Saskatchewan. In most cases, as long as the testator (person making the Will) is at least 18 and is “of sound mind”, they can make a legal Will.

Having said that, there are a few situations where someone may want to get in touch with a lawyer to make a Will, such as:

  • If they want to exclude a spouse, child, or another dependant from their Will;
  • If they want to distribute their assets unequally among their children;
  • If they are in a second marriage/common-law relationship but have children from a prior relationship;
  • If there is a family member who is receiving government disability benefits;
  • If they own real estate outside the province that cannot be dealt with under a Saskatchewan Will; or
  • If they want to engage in sophisticated tax planning.

Learn more here

How can I appoint a guardian for my children?

Generally, parents are the legal guardians of their children. If one of them passes away before the other, the surviving parent would usually continue to be the children’s legal guardian.

A parent (or other legal guardian of minor children) can name someone in their Will to take over that role in case they are the last surviving guardian of the children. If the last surviving guardian passes away (or if both guardians die at the same time), the person named in Will would assume the responsibilities of guardianship.

What is a Power of Attorney?

Someone’s Will only takes effect once they are no longer alive. However, there are many cases where someone is alive, but is no longer capable of making decisions for themselves. For example, this can happen as a result of an accident or due to general cognitive decline that can occur with ageing. This is where a Power of Attorney (POA) becomes important.

A POA is made by someone while they are still mentally capable. It allows them to name the person who would be authorized to manage their affairs in case they are alive but have lost the capacity to manage things for themselves. An “Enduring Power of Attorney for Property and Personal Care” appoints someone to manage both finances (e.g. paying bills, managing investments) and personal affairs (e.g. deciding on where the person will live).

An Enduring POA can be signed in the presence of one witness, if that witness is a lawyer. If there is no lawyer to witness, then two (non-lawyer) witnesses are required.

What is a Health Care Directive?

A Health Care Directive appoints a “proxy” to make health care decisions for someone if they lose the capacity to make those decisions for themselves. In some provinces, this type of document is referred to as a Power of Attorney for Personal Care or a Personal Directive, and is sometimes also referred to as a Living Will.